The Comanche Story

It all starts with a phone call from one brother to another brother about a crazy idea to buy a plane……

Morgan, my brother and CFII, had researched the Piper Comanche 250 and 260 models. We wanted a plane that was fast, fuel efficient, had razor sharp handling, able to carry an entire family without pushing the envelope and was in the 60k-80k dollar range. Welcome to having your cake and eating it too. The Comanche 260B was perfect.

The Comanche fit the requirements so well it was nearly unbelievable. We began getting the finances together and planning the details about how to turn this dream into reality. We began our 8 month arduous process of searching for the perfect Comanche 260 B. To our surprise, many many planes out there have had poor record keeping, rendering them as valuable as scrap metal.

During this search process our father, James, caught wind of our crazy idea to buy a Piper Comanche 260 B and insisted he be involved. So with James leading the search and putting in countless hours of reviewing ads and airplane records, he was hard pressed to find the right plane. However, June 2014 rewarded us with an ad on Controller.com. It was here that we spotted N9238P owned by Kent Gillan, Chief of Aviation for Chick-fil-a. N9238p was located in Peachtree, Ga. Morgan, his good friend and A&P Mechanic, along with his former flight instructor Tom, flew out to Peachtree to inspect the bird.

Here she is in Georgia, nice and comfortable in Kent’s hanger.

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As it turns out, 38p was located near a corner with my brothers name!! WOW, must be fate! Let me introduce you to my brother, Morgan Pylant, A&P mechanic and CFII standing on the corner of Morgan street and Pylant Street.

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Background and Notable Comanche Links

Background and Notable Links

-May your props always spin

 

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